How to Print at Kinko's

As a small-business owner, being on top of your game matters, especially when it comes to material preparation for the next big board meeting or client consultation. Using an office printer is convenient, but when they go on the fritz, when you're traveling or when you need something a little extra special, having it printed elsewhere is a must. Office-designed flyers might be black and white on thin paper, while FedEx flyers can be printed in color on heavier paper to help you make a good impression.

What Happened to Kinko's?

Back in the early 2000s, FedEx bought Kinko's, the famous print and design shop. With this change, consumers and small-business owners gained access to the ability to print, pack and ship all from one location. Over the years, FedEx Kinko's became FedEx Office, providing the same excellent service.

FedEx Office Mobile App

One of the easiest ways to print at FedEx Office is to download the FedEx Office mobile app, available from the App Store or Google Play. You will be able to access any document on your phone or in the cloud. You can also access documents that you've uploaded to your FedEx account and then select your needed printing services and print at the kiosk. To save your small business some money on larger projects, be on the lookout for FedEx printing coupons, often advertised on the website.

FedEx Print & Go Cost

The FedEx Print & Go cost varies depending on the size of your print project, materials and finishing touches. Try calling your local store and asking about prices for a few different scenarios to get an idea of what to budget for this service.

If you're buzzing out the door to meet a prospective client and remember that you forgot to print a crucial document, FedEx can help. Simply email your document directly to printandgo@fedex.com and then watch your email for a retrieval code that you can use at an in-store kiosk or at the full-service counter. You'll be able to choose your print specifications and head to your meeting without skipping a beat.

Print From USB

If you prefer to print your business documents from a USB rather than from your phone, FedEx has you covered. Simply head to the in-store printing kiosk and plug in your USB drive. You'll be able to select all of your printing specifications and then head out with your finished document in short order. Depending on what you require, you might also need to visit the counter, especially if you want your document to be bound, laminated or put into a binder.

Print From a Laptop

If you have the ability to plan ahead, it's simple to send documents to FedEx Office to be printed from your laptop. You can email it to printandgo@fedex.com or head to the website, where you can choose from a variety of print projects, including documents, business cards, posters, brochures, flyers and more. Some print projects can be completed quickly, while others will require you to wait a few hours or more before you can pick up your completed order.

Make Copies at FedEx Office

If you already have a printed document and you need to make photocopies before your upcoming meeting, simply bring the document to the FedEx Office store. Their self-serve copy machines are set up for you to pay for and then make the copies you need. Make sure to have a debit or credit card ready to pay for your project at the copy machine.

Other FedEx Office Services

FedEx Office also offers on-site computer rental so you can design and print projects using high-quality programs and materials. Employees are available for design consultations, and some stores even offer notary public services. You also have access to a full range of packing and shipping services to benefit your small business.

References

About the Author

Anne Kinsey is an entrepreneur and business pioneer, who has ranked in the top 1% of the direct sales industry, growing a large team and earning the title of Senior Team Manager during her time with Jamberry. She is the nonprofit founder and executive director of Love Powered Life, as well as a Certified Trauma Recovery Coach, certified HRV biofeedback practitioner and freelance writer who has written for publications like Working Mother, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Houston Chronicle and Our Everyday Life. Anne works from her home office in rural North Carolina, where she resides with her husband and three children.