How to Create Tabbed Brochures

paper background image by robert mobley from Fotolia.com

When you have your own company or an event to throw, your budget may be limited. Creating your own tabbed brochures can help you reach your audience and save money. Tabbed brochures are great for selling property, putting on a conference or even giving step-by-step instructions for building a product you sell or may have built yourself.

When you have your own company or an event to throw, your budget may be limited. Creating your own tabbed brochures can help you reach your audience and save money. Tabbed brochures are great for selling property, putting on a conference or even giving step-by-step instructions for building a product you sell or may have built yourself.

How to Create a Three-tabbed Brochure Sized at 8 ½ by 7 Inches

Create a mock brochure. Place one 8 ½ by 14-inch piece of multipurpose paper in front of you horizontally. From the top, fold down the paper toward you 5 inches, leaving 1 inch of the multipurpose paper exposed thus creating your first tab. Next, place one 8 ½ by 14-inch piece of multipurpose paper horizontally underneath your first piece of paper. Make sure the bottom edges line up with the edges of your first piece of paper. From the top, fold down the paper toward you 4 ½ inches, leaving 1 inch of the paper exposed thus creating your second tab. Then, place one 8 ½ by 14-inch piece of paper horizontally underneath your first and second piece of paper. Make sure the bottom edges line up with the edges of your first and second piece of multipurpose paper. From the top, fold down the paper toward you 4 inches, leaving 1 inch of the multipurpose paper exposed thus creating your third tab.

Create images for your tabbed brochure by either taking pictures yourself or purchasing images online. If the images are not yours, you will need to obtain the copyrights in order to use the images. Upload images to your computer, save the images as jpeg or gif images on a USB disk.

Next, type the creative text for your tabbed brochure in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint or Visio using text boxes. With text boxes you are able to type in paragraph form, use bullets and select the size, style and color of font. Or if you prefer, you can use a brochure template, which will give you the same options. Free brochure templates can be found online. Using Microsoft products or a brochure template will give you the ability to edit, if needed.

Save all pictures, graphics and creative text boxes on the same USB disk.

Size your images and creative text boxes to fit on your tabbed brochure. Note the size of your tabbed brochure because you will need the images and text boxes to fit. Your cover will be 8 ½ by 4 inches, your first tab will be 8 ½ by 4 ½ inches, your second tab will be 8 ½ by 5 inches, your third tab will be 8 ½ by 6 inches, and your back cover will be 8 ½ by 7 inches.

Print the images and creative text boxes you have saved on your USB disk. You can print in black or color. Then cut the text boxes and images out and arrange them on your blank mock brochure. If you need to, open your images or text boxes on your USB disk and resize to fit appropriately on the mock brochure. Once size and place is achieved, glue images and text boxes to your mock brochure.

Printing can be expensive, but printing shops tend to give deals on bulk orders.
The printer image by vin5 from Fotolia.com

Consider the cost of ink and wear and tear on your printer verses printing your brochures at a printer shop. Many retail or chain companies, such as Office Depot or Office Max, will professionally print your brochure for you. They will allow you to select the paper grade, size and color you desire to create that look and feel of a professional tabbed brochure. Take in your mock tabbed brochure and the USB disk that holds your images and creative text boxes so they are able to print off of high resolution images.

References

Resources

About the Author

Shatane Sexton-Snyder has been writing since 1995. Her work includes a book, "A Nomadic Journey," and she has worked in the Internet industry for several years writing articles, bi-folders, direct mailers, e-blasts, contracts and scopes for national campaigns. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in political science from California State University.

Photo Credits

  • paper background image by robert mobley from Fotolia.com