How to Sell Vending Machines

by Maggie Gebremichael; Updated September 26, 2017

Vending machines are found almost everywhere, including in schools, hospitals, grocery stores, gas stations, shopping malls, hotels and office buildings. Machines disperse items such as candy, snacks, drinks, pet products, stickers, cards, lottery tickets and movies. You can directly sell vending machines to wholesalers, retailers, or to end users, such as property owners or school districts.

Step 1

Assess the machines’ condition. Gumball and candy machines are very different from machines that disperse cold beverages. Identify if the machines are new, like new, or gently used machines that function well retain strong market value. If your machines do not work, consider selling parts individually. Many major cities have vending machine repairmen or technicians that might be interested in your machines.

Step 2

Value the machines based on overall condition and market value. You might get a higher rate when you sell the machines in a city or urban area rather than in rural setting. Be careful about shipping across long distances; you increase the likelihood of damaging the machines.

Step 3

Contact local, regional and national wholesalers or retailers. You might encounter rejection because some businesses buy only from manufacturers, similar to car dealers. However, persistently promote the machines, particularly to dealers or retailers who maintain used products. Highlight multiple quantities, such as if you have five machines of the same model.

Step 4

To reach end users, advertise machines through different mediums, such as online or trade publications. Target small to mid-size business owners who likely do not have vending machines. New residential developments represent great potential buyers, especially as conveniently placed machines (e.g., fitness center, pool) can create a selling point. Post listings on websites.

Step 5

Bundle machines with stock routes to persuade property and business owners that they can purchase vending machines at discounted rates. For instance, convince buyers that machines will not create significant burdens because buyers can pay someone to replenish machines. You also could offer to transport the machines free, but make sure that you receive full payment before you send anything.

Tips

  • Appraise your vending machine, especially if you have antique equipment.

Warnings

  • You might have to pay in order to advertise your machines.

About the Author

Maggie Gebremichael has been a freelance writer since 2002. She speaks Spanish fluently and resides in Texas. When she is not writing articles for eHow.com, Gebremichael loves to travel internationally and learn about different cultures. She obtained an undergraduate degree with a focus on anthropology and business from the University of Texas and enjoys writing about her various interests.