How to Apply for a Loan Using an EIN Number

by Stephanie Mojica - Updated September 26, 2017

Applying for a loan using an employer identification number, or EIN number, can only legally be done as a business entity. Using an EIN in place of a social security number on a personal credit application is a crime. However, legitimate businesses with an EIN number and other corporate documents, such as a license and state incorporation, can apply for loans and credit cards. In some cases, however, the owner’s social security number may still be required.

Visit your local bank or credit union. Ask the teller if you can apply for a business loan using your corporate information. Provide your EIN number to the representative with whom you meet, and offer company information, such as the year it started and the nature of the business.

Visit websites of major lenders, such as Wells Fargo and Citibank (see Resources). They each have programs where businesses can apply for credit cards and loans using their EIN number. Select a program and apply for it, providing your personal and business information as requested.

Decide if your loan needs also include credit cards. If so, these are fairly easy to obtain using an EIN number and other business information. Start with office supply stores, such as Staples (see Resources), and then move on to department stores, gas stations and major credit cards.

Check your business credit periodically using Dun and Bradstreet and Experian Business (see Resources). This will help you evaluate how good your credit under your EIN number is, which can assist in further loan applications.

Tips

  • Once you have several positive accounts reporting on Dun and Bradstreet and Experian, it will be easier to get loans and credit cards without the possibility of a lender wanting to check your personal credit through your social security number.

About the Author

Stephanie Mojica has been a journalist since 1997 and currently works as a full-time reporter at the daily newspaper "The Advocate-Messenger" in Kentucky. Her articles have also appeared in newspapers such as "The Philadelphia Inquirer" and "The Virginian-Pilot," as well as several online publications. She holds a bachelor's degree from Athabasca University.

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