Can I Be My Own Registered Agent?

by Tim Plaehn ; Updated September 26, 2017
Businessman signing the contract

Almost every state requires that corporations and limited liability companies have a registered agent on file with Secretary of State's office. The designated agent's purpose is to receive legal notices sent to the corporation or LLC. You can act as your own registered agent if you meet the requirements for the position.

Agent Must Be Available During Business Hours

Since the purpose of a registered agent is to receive legal papers directed to the corporation or LLC, the agent is required have a place of business that is open during regular business hours. The agent's location address must be in the state of incorporation and be open to receive deliveries 9 to 5, Monday through Friday. The address must be on file with the Secretary of State, kept up to date, and available to the public. Your company cannot be the named agent. An individual in the company must be the designated registered agent.

About the Author

Tim Plaehn has been writing financial, investment and trading articles and blogs since 2007. His work has appeared online at Seeking Alpha, Marketwatch.com and various other websites. Plaehn has a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the U.S. Air Force Academy.

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