How Do I Get Pepsi Products in My Restaurant?

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If you are a restaurant owner, you probably know that popular soft drinks have an attractive profit margin. If you have decided that Pepsi is the brand you want to serve, some simple steps will seal the deal.

Internet Help

U.S. Army base food court in Kuwait
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Get in touch with Pepsi through its website. The website has a form that will prompt you to list information a representative will review before contacting you (see Resources section). The form has fields for how and when to contact you, how soon you’ll need the products and space for any special comments or questions. You can get Pepsi into your restaurant fairly quickly, but to make sure everything goes smooth, contact a rep and begin the process a couple of months in advance.

Direct Telephone Help

Pepsi soft drink options
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Do not use the form if you don't want to share private business information. A Pepsi representative can visit your restaurant if you call the company at (800) 932-0966.

What to Order

Double cheeseburger, french fries and a Pepsi drink
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What sells in one area may not sell somewhere else. The Pepsi representative can make suggestions, or you can go to GrowMyRestuarant.com, a website developed by PepsiCo Food Service. Once you have an account with Pepsi, you can log in, input your restaurant’s specifics and see what is recommended for your type of restaurant and your region.

Equipment

Various soft drink cups on top of soda dispenser
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Use appropriate equipment for your location. Your soft drink dispenser will either be a pre-mix or post-mix system. Pre-mix systems usually have a smaller CO2 tank and are suitable for small establishments. The drinks are delivered in canisters as a finished product. Larger operations may use a post-mix system; the drinks are delivered as syrup in boxes that is mixed with carbonated water. This will require more space and more CO2, but the price per serving is usually lower.

References

Resources

About the Author

Lee Morgan is a fiction writer and journalist. His writing has appeared for more than 15 years in many news publications including the "Tennesseean," the "Tampa Tribune," "West Hawaii Today," the "Honolulu Star Bulletin" and the "Dickson Herald," where he was sports editor. He holds a Bachelor of Science in mass communications from Middle Tennessee State University.

Photo Credits

  • Tim Boyle/Getty Images News/Getty Images