The Disadvantages of Process Mapping

by Jessica Jones; Updated September 26, 2017
A process map outlines specific processes in the workplace.

A process map outlines the job duties performed to complete a specific task at the workplace. Maps can be used to outline manufacturing processes, corporate structures and management tasks. Process maps provide valuable information about a process to help management find ways to make the process even better. While there are many advantages to creating process maps, there are a few disadvantages that should not be overlooked.

Accuracy of Data

Data collected to create a process map needs to be accurate in order for the map to be helpful in outlining a process. Employees using current processes are usually asked to contribute to data collection. Collection methods include surveys, interviews, anaylsis of the process, statistical and past performance data. Sometimes the data collected may not be representative of the entire process or may become skewed by opinion or employee dissatisfaction.

Process Map Details

To create an accurate process map requires an attention to detail. If you do not have the patience or skill to create a process map the task can become overwhelming. This can lead to errors in interpreting data or positioning data on the map.

Input Range

Process maps typically include data from small groups of employees. This data may not be representative of the entire process, however, if the process is large or spans multiple departments. To create a more accurate process map, you may have to first create a draft using data from a small group of employees. Sending this draft to a larger group for feedback and to verify accuracy increases the time it takes to produce an accurate process map.

Facilitation

Participation from employees and management is necessary to compile accurate date to create a process map. Those creating the map must clearly outline their objectives to management. Management needs to encourage employees to provide useful information based on the objectives. Without clear communication between those creating the process map and management, the data collected may not be as accurate or useful as it could be.

About the Author

Based in the Washington metro area, Jessica Jones has been a freelance writer since 2006, specializing in business topics. Her fiction has also been featured in publications such as "The Jamaican Observer Sunday Literary Supplement" and at websites including HackWriters. Jones earned a Master of Fine Arts in fiction writing from Lesley University.

Photo Credits

  • process flow image by Christopher Hall from Fotolia.com