What Are Some Things One Would Find in a Pharmacy?

by Stuart Robertson; Updated September 26, 2017
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The main product sold in most pharmacies is drugs and various pharmaceutical products. These products are split up into groups that require a prescription, which are handled by the pharmacists, and groups that do not require a prescription, such as over-the-counter drugs, and can be purchased by whoever wants them. Pharmacies often stock various toiletries and vitamins, as well.

Prescription Drugs

The main product stocked and sold by pharmacies is drugs of various kinds, many of which require a doctor's prescription to obtain. The filling of an order for prescription drugs is handled by the pharmacist, who is someone that is knowledgeable about the various drugs and their possible interactions, and is qualified to sell the pharmaceuticals to customers.

Nonprescription Drugs

Pharmacies also sell many drugs that do not require a prescription to purchase. Painkillers, for instance, are a popular product stocked by pharmacies, as are drugs that alleviate allergy symptoms. Pharmacists employed at the pharmacy can be consulted about possible health concerns of nonprescription drugs, and any possible reactions with other drugs that are being taken, whether they are prescription or nonprescription.

Toiletries

In addition, pharmacies often stock different kinds of toiletries. Products like toothpaste, deodorants, shampoos and conditioners are all products commonly found at a pharmacy. Pharmacies integrated with a grocery store may also stock cleaning supplies such as dish soap or different kinds of laundry detergents.

Vitamins and Minerals

Another product commonly stocked by pharmacies is vitamins and minerals. Vitamins and minerals are similar to nonprescription drugs in that they do not require a prescription, but do have an effect on the body. As with many drugs, there is the possibility that different vitamins and minerals may interact in unexpected ways, either with other vitamins and minerals or with drugs, which is why many people prefer to buy vitamins and minerals where they have access to the knowledge of a pharmacist.

About the Author

Stuart Robertson has been freelance writing since 2008, covering topics such as health, environmental issues and technology for websites such as Chiff.com and Environmental Graffiti. He has a bachelor's degree in political science.

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