Similarities Between Super Target & Super Walmart

by Lindsay Barnes; Updated September 26, 2017
...

Both opening their doors in 1962, the Super Target and Super Walmart have more in common than just the year they opened. Super Target and Super Walmart share many of the same features. While each has sought to create its own niche, the general blueprint for the two supermarket giants is parallel. Building on the sales pitch to save the consumer’s pocketbook, Super Walmart and Super Target stay neck and neck with their competitive pricing.

Brands

Both Target and Walmart have embraced the model of creating a brand exclusive to that one chain. You can find the Archer Farms brand, among other exclusive brands, in all Super Targets. With a product family including everything from ice cream to olive oil, you can recognize the Archer Farms brand by its dark green and off-white packaging, with the little red rooster logo. You can recognize the Walmart Great Value brand by its simple packaging titled Great Value in blue and white.

Departments

Both Super Target and Super Walmart offer the same general setup of home, clothing, auto, garden, home improvement and grocery departments. Back-to-school, Christmas and Halloween departments also pop up at the superstores, when in season. Both superstores provide the services of a photo center, deli and pharmacy.

Prices

The grocery prices at Super Target and the grocery prices at Super Walmart are almost identical. In 2011, CNN Money reported on a study price comparing 22 common grocery items between Walmart and Target. “Target’s shopping cart rang in at $269.13 (pretax), a hair lower than the $271.07 charged at Wal-Mart,” says Parija Kavilanz, a senior writer at CNN Money. Both have keyed in on being a value superstore, down to their very slogans: Target's is “Expect more. Pay less,” and Walmart's is “Save money. Live better” -- strikingly similar.

Store Layout

The main aisles leading to departments are setups that both stores have embraced. Both superstores have placed departments in accordance with their relation to a department across the aisle, creating a convenient shopping experience for the buyer. In addition, both offer speedy checkouts, if you have a certain number of items, and offer a large row of regular checkouts at the front of the store.

About the Author

Lindsay Barnes began writing for a real-estate education business in 2005, and later for a local politician. She has worked as a political campaign manager and public relations coordinator. Barnes holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism with an emphasis in public relations from the University of Oklahoma.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images