Office Games to Get to Know Co-workers

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The mix of different experiences and personalities can make forming relationships challenging. If there are new hires in your office, try some icebreakers to learn more about each other and enjoy yourself in the process. Office games to get to know co-workers help form new bonds.

White Lie

A slightly competitive office game to play is called “white lie.” Each person in the group writes down three statements on a piece of paper. Write two statements that are true and one statement that is false. Each person in the group then reads the three statements out loud. The rest of the group votes on which statements are true and which are false. The person who gets the lowest number of votes for her "lie" wins this game.

Handcuffs

Handcuff co-workers together, with strings. Cut each string to a length of approximately 20 inches. Tie the ends of the string so that there are large loops that will form the opening for the handcuffs. One person puts the loops around her wrists and puts her hands out straight. Another co-worker puts one string first around the middle of the string of the other person, and then puts the ends around his wrists. Each person must then try to remove the string cuffs without cutting the string or taking his wrists out from the string handcuffs.

Name Game

Split the group of people into pairs. If there is an odd number of people, just add a third person to one group. Each pair brainstorms to come up with descriptive words that describe each person using the letters of the person's name. Share your answers with the team. This game is not a competition. It is simply a way to collaborate and laugh together.

Office Bingo

Play office bingo with the office team. Make custom bingo boards with information about team members in the squares. Each square should contain a description of one person on the team. The descriptions should be a bit funny. The goal is to find a team member who matches the description and have her sign that square. She can't sign more than two squares on your board. The goal is to get a straight line of signatures.

References

About the Author

Sydney Lundgren has been a technical writer since 2008, in addition to writing a column in his university newspaper. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin with dual degrees in business administration and political science. Sydney enjoys writing about travel, health and fitness.

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