The Average Time to Get a Job After an Interview

There is no standard time frame between a job interview and the actual job offer. The given time between the two events depends on the company’s immediate need for the position, the amount of applicants and the position’s placement in the company’s hierarchy. Review the job position information for an expected start date, and write a follow-up email to the employer to learn about your current application status.

Expected Hiring Date

You might be able to calculate an approximate time between an interview and a job offer, if the original job posting lists a starting date. For instance, if the starting date is Oct. 1 and the interview takes place around Sept. 10 or Sept. 15, you should hear back from the potential employer within the first week after the interview. An employer recognizes the fact that it is customary for you to give a two-week notice at your current job before starting a new one.

Status of Hiring Process

Another factor that influences the length of time between an interview and a job offer is the amount of applicants and interviews. Some hiring managers select a shortlist immediately from all the applicants, while others interview a long list of applicants of 30 or more people. This interview process often includes telephone interviews first, followed by one or more in-person interviews. Depending on the process chosen by the hiring department, the hiring process can take months.

Company Availability

The time frame between the job interview and the offer of employment can be prolonged if the company does not have the available management to review all of the applications and decide which people go through to the second round of interviews. In addition, the hiring process could be slow if the position is not of immediate importance. If the company is losing money because work is lost, an offer might be extended to a highly qualified applicant.

Position Placement in the Company

It can take longer to receive an offer after an interview if the given position is higher in the company’s hierarchy, according to Top Sales Jobs. The site explains that it is not uncommon for the senior position hiring process to stretch months, especially if salary and benefits package negotiations are expected.

References

About the Author

Based in Toronto, Mary Jane has been writing for online magazines and databases since 2002. Her articles have appeared on the Simon & Schuster website and she received an editor's choice award in 2009. She holds a Master of Arts in psychology of language use from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.