How to Have a Fun Staff Meeting

by Brittany Laneaux; Updated September 26, 2017
Staff meetings don't have to be boring or redundant.

Staff meetings, while valuable to company productivity, can be dreaded by everyone involved. According to an article in Biodiesel Magazine, “happy, productive employees can boost company revenue,” so why not put some effort into making these meetings fun? With just a few steps, staff meetings can go from a loathed duty to an anticipated highlight in your employee’s day.

Items you will need

  • Food
  • Small gifts
Step 1

Name it. Whether your staff meetings are weekly or monthly, send out an email the day before with an agenda and the title of the meeting. The title could be holiday-related depending on the time of year, could allude to an interoffice joke or set a theme that the entire meeting follows. It makes the meeting feel more like an event, rather than a redundant meeting everyone is required to attend.

Step 2

Include a toy. This toy can be something that loosens everyone up while still promoting productivity. For example, a stress squeeze ball can be waiting on every one’s chair or an insulated mug with fresh coffee brewed and ready to pour. People like gifts.

Step 3

Don’t take yourself too seriously. Especially if you are running the meeting, allow room for a few jokes and play. The play should not be excessive or disruptive, but people want to feel like they can be themselves and appreciate a supervisor they can relate to. By the leader letting loose a little, it gives permission to everyone else to do the same.

Step 4

Provide food. Coordinate the food to the time of day . If you have morning staff meetings, bring donuts, breakfast burritos or bagels. Try to be considerate of those on your staff with allergies. Food can even be the responsibility of the staff if they are eager to try it. A schedule can be made and two people each week or month can choose and bring the food.

Step 5

Mix in some social time. Start the meeting 10 minutes early and allow the food and toys to work their magic while people talk and socialize. This also gets their brains working before the meeting actually begins and gives people an incentive to be on time.

About the Author

Brittany Laneaux has been teaching writing since 2004. Her work appears on various websites and she has provided Web content, brochures, freelance blogging and other writing assignments through her graphic/Web design and print business. Laneaux holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Texas at Austin.

Photo Credits

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