How Do I Get Certified to Sell DME and Bill Medicare?

by Nina Nixon; Updated September 26, 2017

According to the United States Department of Labor, employment in the medical equipment industry is expected to increase by 27 percent between 2008 and 2018. The demand for durable medical equipment, or DME, is not going to slow down any time soon. As a Medicare-approved supplier, you are in a better position to win sales over your competition. DME suppliers who are not Medicare-approved will have difficulty receiving compensation and billing Medicare to help offset the costs of DME sales.

Items you will need

  • Taxpayer identification number
  • National provider identifier
  • Bank account information
  • Form CMS-588
  • NSC number, provider transaction access number or Medicare identification number (if already enrolled)
  • Business and professional licenses held pertaining to your offerings
  • Surety bonds and liability insurance
Step 1

Visit the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System website and apply for a user ID and password.

Step 2

Check your email for an approval notification from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS. After you have received notification that you have been granted approval via email by CMS, go to the next step.

Step 3

Visit the Medicare Enrollment for Providers and Suppliers, Medicare Provider Enrollment, Chain and Ownership System, or PECOS, website. Log in, download and fill out the security consent form. The security consent form contains separate areas and signature requirements for the supplier organization and employer organization. The data you enter in both sections should be the same if you are requesting approval to submit the enrollment applications, and you are an authorized official employed by the supplier organization. Sign and date the security consent form in both places and mail it to the CMS External User Services Help Desk.

Step 4

Check your email for notification that your security consent request has been approved.

Step 5

Log in to the Internet-based PECOS system and fill out the enrollment application form CMS-855. Click "Continue" and follow the on-screen prompts to complete the application.

Step 6

Print a copy of the enrollment application for your records.

Step 7

Mail any supporting documentation as recommended by PECOS.

Step 8

Print, date and sign the certification statement and mail it to the National Supplier Clearinghouse -- Medicare Administrative Contractor within one week.

Step 9

Check your email for a notification that your Medicare supplier form enrollment application form was successfully transmitted online.

Step 10

Wait at least 15 days, then log in to the PECOS system to check the status of your application. If you have supporting documents to mail, count 15 days after you have mailed those documents before you check the status of your application.

Step 11

Research what Medicare pays for so that you can accurately bill the agency when applicable. The new Medicare program, effective January 2011, pays for oxygen equipment, power wheelchairs and associated repairs. Certain geographical areas and other restrictions apply. As of January 2011, this program is still in its early stages and is continually being developed.

Tips

  • You must be an authorized official of the organization you want to register as a Medicare supplier to complete these steps.

    Allow several weeks to complete the enrollment process. Alternately, you could fill out the paper version of the Medicare enrollment application, form CMS-855S, in lieu of applying online.

Warnings

  • CMS recommends users change their PECOS password at least once a year.

    Medicare has created different rules based on the various types of DME it covers. Typically, after the deductible is met, 80 percent of the balance is Medicare-approved and can be billed. Each situation varies, so contact Medicare in each situation prior to billing the agency.

About the Author

Nina Nixon has more than 30 years of professional writing experience. She enjoys writing about business and technology. Her articles have appeared on Chron, eHow Business & Personal Finance, Techwalla, and other digital content publishing websites.