How to Obtain a Class C Contractor's License in Virginia

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If you are a contractor in Virginia and receive $1000 or more for the completion of a project, you must have a contractor license from the Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation. There are three license classifications, the lowest of which is a Class C license. A Class C license allows you to complete a single project for up to $10,000 and a total of $150,000 worth of projects for the entire year. Unlike applicants for a Class A or Class B license, you do not have to take a licensing examination for a Class C license.

Meet the minimum requirements for a Class C license and for any specialty designations for which you are applying. When you apply for a Class C license, you can choose from 40 specialties, including specialties such as electrical and plumbing. In addition to being at least 18 years old, you must have two years of experience in the specialty.

Complete an eight-hour pre-licensing education course from an approved education provider. You can find a list of approved providers on the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation website, whose link is given in the resources section of this article.

Download the Class C license application from the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation website.

Complete the Class C license application by providing the requested information about yourself and your business. Select the specialty designations in which you will be working.

Mail the application and a check or money order for the license fee, which is $235 as of December 2010, to the Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation address printed at the top of the application. The department will issue your license after it approves the application and confirms that you satisfied all of the requirements.

Tips

  • You must renew the license every two years.

Warnings

  • Entering into a contract that exceeds the $10,000 per-project maximum can result in the revocation of your license.

About the Author

Tom Johnson graduated from the University of South Carolina in 1995 with a Bachelor of Science in finance. He has worked in the insurance industry for over 15 years and is currently employed by a government agency that regulates insurance companies and brokers. Johnson began freelance writing in 2009, focusing his efforts on insurance and finance-related articles.

Photo Credits

  • David Sacks/Lifesize/Getty Images