How to Write a Transaction Letter

by Lane Cummings; Updated September 26, 2017
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A transaction letter has a slightly deceptive name. While it might sound like the letter will itemize a deal or contract between two companies or parties, the exact function of this type of letter is actually more routine. A transaction letter refers to a formal type of business letter where an individual writes to a particular business asking for more detailed information about the company. This letter is useful when you want to establish formal correspondence with a business and get a clear foundation of their ins and outs.

Step 1

Type your address including email in four or five lines in the top left-hand corner of the page. Skip a line and type the date. Skip another line and type the name of the company you're contacting, plus their address in three lines.

Step 2

Skip a line and write "Dear" plus the name of the person you've been in contact with. Alternatively, if you're directing your letter to a particular department, you could write "Dear Director/Manager of Finance" or whatever department you're contacting. On the other hand, you can always write, "To Whom it May Concern."

Step 3

Explain your interest in the company and the information you've reviewed thus far. State however, that you still have lingering questions or that certain practices aren't quite clear.

Step 4

Itemize your questions or concerns in bullet points in the next paragraph, so that they stand out. Your questions could range from asking about the patents they hold -- or what kind of insurance they carry -- to if they offer a product guarantee. Ask any question you like.

Step 5

Encourage him to contact you at the address at the top of the letter or at your email. Type "Sincerely," and then underneath it, type your name.

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."

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