How to Start a Union Company

by Danny Donahue; Updated September 26, 2017
Safety is the number-one priority on any union jobsite.

Starting any company involves finding and training workers who will provide professional and ethical service while maintaining absolutely strict safety protocols. Training is one of the most expensive facets of running a business. But if you could avoid this expense you would hire trained professionals who already conform to these standards if you could. Setting your company up as a union company will allow you to skip the training and head straight to work. Union members are experienced, ethical and are required to participate in ongoing safety training. A union company is a safe and productive company.

Step 1

Obtain a business license from your local licensing authority. Purchase all of the necessary insurance for your industry from your insurance agent.

Step 2

Contact your state contractor's board. Obtain the study materials that they offer. Pay any necessary fees. Show up early at the testing facility. Take the test and wait for your results and license to be delivered to you.

Step 3

Contact the United States Occupational and Health Safety Administration (OSHA) to obtain an up-to-date copy of their workplace safety regulations. Learn these rules and integrate them into your company's safety guidelines.

Step 4

Take any OSHA and OSHA-approved safety classes that you can find that pertain to your specific industry. Study hard, work hard and collect as many safety certifications as you can.

Step 5

Use the safety training you have received to purchase safety equipment. Buy top-of-the-line safety gear, store it properly in a safe dry place and keep it in good working order at all times. Inspect your safety equipment daily to be sure your employees will be as safe as possible while performing their duties.

Step 6

Contact various unions in your area. Meet with each union representative, explain the nature of your business and how you intend to utilize the union members in your employ. Sign contracts with each union that will supply your company with workers. Join each of the unions that you qualify for so that your company and your job sites will be 100-percent union jobs.

Step 7

Find jobs through online sources, in the local newspaper or other sources such as your local employment commission. Speak with the superintendents at each site, explain your qualifications and the benefits of hiring your company, which is strictly a safety-oriented, well-trained union workforce.

Warnings

  • On union job sites safety is job number one.

    Review all contracts thoroughly before signing them. Have your attorney review any contracts that you do not completely understand.

About the Author

After learning electronics in the U.S. Navy in the 1980s, Danny Donahue spent a lifetime in the construction industry. He has worked with some of the finest construction talent in the Southeastern United States. Donahue has been a freelance writer since 2008, focusing his efforts on his beloved construction projects.

Photo Credits

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