How to Write a Project Scope for Construction Projects

by Jennifer VanBaren; Updated September 26, 2017
A project scope states all details of a construction project.

A project scope is a written statement that describes the work needed in a construction project. It is designed to inform the project team what needs to be completed. A project scope is created during the first step of planning a project and sets the tone for the remainder of the project planning. It is prepared by a general contractor and is given to companies bidding on the job.

Step 1

Review the blueprints, drawings and specifications of the project. A project scope is created by someone knowledgeable in the construction field. The person creating it must completely understand how the project must be carried out. When the scope is written, the drawings and specifications are referred to frequently.

Step 2

Create a project charter. A charter is necessary for authorizing the project, providing a high level overview of it and identifying the main stakeholders. The charter includes the names of the project owner and sponsors. It also identifies the project objectives and constraints. Throughout the life of the project, the charter is referred to often.

Step 3

Identify the purpose or reason of the project. This statement is often referred to as the project justification. This statement contains two or three sentences explaining the purpose and importance of the project, and is included in the project charter.

Step 4

List the project requirements. This next section of the project scope is designated for requirements, deliverables and non-goals. The requirements of the job are objectives expected to be met, including all significant milestones. Non-goals are items that do not fit into any specific category of objectives. The deliverables are included in this section and must be very specific. Deliverables are agreed upon materials, including training, required for the job.

Step 5

Determine cost estimates. The costs should be estimated as realistically as possible to keep the project moving along while staying on budget. Each specific aspect of the job should be calculated and listed individually.

Step 6

Obtain formal acceptance signatures. After the project scope is complete, it is customary to hold a meeting to obtain the appropriate signatures for acceptance of the project scope.

About the Author

Jennifer VanBaren started her professional online writing career in 2010. She taught college-level accounting, math and business classes for five years. Her writing highlights include publishing articles about music, business, gardening and home organization. She holds a Bachelor of Science in accounting and finance from St. Joseph's College in Rensselaer, Ind.

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