How to Sell IT Support

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Information Technology services are much needed by both large and small businesses. Technology continues to grow at an exponential rate, and sometimes it's difficult for a company to keep up. While many companies may need your services, they may not realize it, or you may have a lot of competition in your area. Convincing a manager to sign on the dotted line can be challenging, but it can be done with research and some creative thinking and presentation.

Research your market. This is essential for any business, but should be done by an IT services professional first. You need to know what type of technology your potential clients are using and what they think they need. Call the company. Ask for an appointment or chat on the phone about which types of computers, software programs, servers and Web services they use. This is not a sales call; you are looking for crucial information that will help you sell to this company later.

Turn your service into a product. By creating a DVD, template, worksheet or other educational materials for your client, you will give him or her something more tangible for the money.

Offer different packages. The value of your IT service can be difficult to convey in the sales pitch. By developing a variety of packages, you give the customer a way to try out your services without being overwhelmed by price. For example, your "Elite" IT service package might include monthly computer maintenance, Web hosting, back-up services and 10 hours a month of on-call consultation. However, other packages might offer lesser amounts of the same services or fewer services.

Sell yourself. Focus your sales conversations on listening to your potential client's pain, and then explain why you-not your service-will solve their problem.

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About the Author

Michelle Hogan is a writer and the author of 13 books including the 2005 bestselling memoir, "Without a Net: Middle Class and Homeless (With Kids) in America." Hogan studied English at American University and has been writing professionally since 1998. Her work has appeared in "The New York Times," "Redbook," "Family Circle" and many other publications.

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