How to Set Up a Pastry Shop

by Ken McCarron; Updated September 26, 2017
A pastry shop can be a profitable business.

Setting up a pastry shop requires a lot of effort, from getting your business license and creating a plan to designing the layout of the shop itself. A pastry shop can be a profitable business once you have customers who love your products and keep coming back for more. Here are some steps to put you on the right path.

Create a business plan that incorporates all elements of your business operations. Include a mission statement, financial plan, competitor analysis, operating plan and marketing strategies. Consider what will give you a clear picture of important aspects of your business such as the types of goods you will sell, your pricing structure, specific marketing tactics, management structure, how many employees you should have and how much to pay them.

Find a location for your pastry shop. Taking over an existing bakery or cafe would be ideal to cut down startup costs. Be sure it is large enough to suit your business model and expectations for future growth. A spot with a lot of foot traffic would be preferable.

Purchase or lease all of the equipment you will need to set up your pastry shop. This will include a regular oven, convection oven, stovetop, exhaust hood, refrigerator, freezer, mixers, baker's racks, baking sheets and pans. You will also need glass display cases, tables, chairs and stools. Contact noncompeting pastry shops for ideas on which wholesalers to use.

Create an in-store display area. Showcase pastries and cakes under glass in a well-lit area. Also display baked goods in your store window if your location allows for foot traffic. Set up tables for customers if space permits. Install a chalkboard on the wall behind the counter to highlight daily specials.

Tips

  • Offer regular specials to help start traditions with your customers.

About the Author

Ken McCarron has been a freelance writer for five years. He has written online articles too numerous to mention. He has also written copy for websites, direct mail, sales letters, new releases, brochures and ads.

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