How to Draw an Invention

by Greyson Ferguson; Updated September 26, 2017

Coming up with a new idea or plan for invention can be exciting, with ideas dancing all about your head. It is a good idea to get them down on paper before aspects of the design are forgotten and lost. Drawing an invention on graph paper is similar to drawing any other design. It needs to be carefully measured and cover all aspects of the design.

Items you will need

  • Grid paper
  • Ruler
Step 1

Grid paper can be purchased from a local office supply store or an art store, or it can be printed through an online service. Grid paper typically is sized by square inch, such as 1 square inch, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 and 1/16. The smaller the square, the more leeway you will have drawing the design because fewer areas will have to be measured with a ruler. The 1/8- or 1/16-size grids will work well.

Step 2

Diagram all the parts you intend to use with your invention. This will help you keep track of their size and how much how large each section of your drawing needs to be. Keep the part diagrams together. If they are drawn on separate pages and scattered about, it will be difficult to keep track of everything.

Step 3

Draw each side of your invention. Even though one perspective may have more significant features, all sides are equally important. Make sure to include the view from above and below. It may help to record measurements next to each piece in the diagram. This will save you from having to count small squares when it comes time to build your invention.

Step 4

Draw enlarged images of intricate designs. These blown-up images will make more sense and more clearly display the pieces. Be sure to write down the scale increase next to each enlarged drawing so you don't become confused when it comes time to build.

Resources

About the Author

Greyson Ferguson is a graduate of the Savannah College of Art and Design with a degree in film and television. He currently resides in Lansing, Michigan where he works on independent film projects and writes for numerous publications. Ferguson primarily focuses on computer and electronic articles. Greyson produces TheDailyUpbeat.com, focusing on only upbeat news stories with daily updates.