How to End a Meeting

by Jerrie Lynn South - DeRose; Updated September 26, 2017

Just as there is a certain protocol for beginning and running a meeting there is a certain protocol for ending a meeting. Whether its a training meeting, board meeting, or other event, learn how to end it properly and effectively.

Step 1

Even if you included the training or meeting steps in a typed agenda that was handed out to participants at the beginning of the event, let participants know verbally that the dialogue is about to close.

Step 2

Go over the purpose of the event and let participants know what you had hoped to achieve through the meeting or training.

Step 3

Review any information that was gathered with participants as a result of the meeting or training, even using the recorder or secretary's notes.

Step 4

Give the meeting or training participants an opportunity to add or correct information, answer any questions they may have and state how the information will be used. This way, employees or other participants will go away from the training or other event feeling secure and comfortable.

Step 5

If your training or meeting included any private information that should not be shared outside the room, state the confidential nature of the information and ask the employees or other participants not to talk about specific comments or privileged information.

Step 6

You may want to ask participants to fill out a rating sheet, or to fill out a comment card rating the meeting or training content. Some facilitators do this in order to help them find out their strengths and weaknesses and for self-improvement.

Step 7

Thank the participants for their input, for being patient with you and for taking the time to make sure they attended the training or other event.

About the Author

Jerrie began writing in 1994 as an early childhood education consultant, reviewing Early Head Start and Head Start programs while assisting with writing and editing reports. She wrote a parenting column from 1993 - 2001. While working on her associate's degree in journalism, Jerrie wrote for the Pratt Community College newspaper. She earned additional education credits in family health and safety, mental health, and disabilities.

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