How to Donate Medical Oxygen Equipment

by Stephanie Reid

Donating medical oxygen equipment is a wonderful way to help those in need. Many people choose to donate oxygen equipment to nations that have recently experienced a natural disaster. Fortunately, many charitable organizations across the country accept shipments of valuable medical supplies -- especially oxygen equipment -- and get them to those in need. Once you have chosen where you would like to donate your equipment, you must figure out how to get the items -- often tax-deductible -- there.

How to Donate Medical Oxygen Supplies

Choose where you would like your donation to go. There are many options around the world, but you can also donate to a local nursing home or person in need. Many charities collect donations of oxygen medical supplies and send them to nations that have been hit by natural disasters. If you choose to donate locally, there are likely plenty of medical organizations that could use oxygen tanks and supplies.

Ensure that your equipment is in good condition and suitable for use. A local medical supply store can quickly and easily check your equipment to make sure it's working and a worthwhile donation.

Investigate how to ship your equipment. Many charities will pay part or all of the cost. Before you ship, research the charity to make sure it's legitimate. GuideStar (guidestar.com) is a free site that provides information on more than 1.8 million IRS-registered charities. If you are donating locally, call before you haul in the equipment to make sure the charity will accept it.

Consider your local veterinary clinic or fire station. Believe it or not, oxygen equipment can be donated to a vet's office or fire house for use on pets in need. It is quite common for pet cats and dogs to get stuck in a burning house and need oxygen after they're rescued.

Charitable donations are often tax-deductible. Be sure to get a receipt for your donation so you can include the deduction on your income tax return. Every little bit helps and the IRS allows for such deductions in order to encourage giving and donations.

About the Author

Stephanie Reid has been writing professionally since 2007, with work published in the Virginia Bar Association's "Family Law Quarterly" and the "Whittier Journal of Child and Family Advocacy." She received her Juris Doctor from Regent University and her Bachelor of Arts in French and child development from Florida State University. Reid is admitted to practice law in Delaware and Maryland.

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