Fun Games to Play With Your Employees

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Employee games do not have to be reserved for office parties. Games can be played as part of team meetings or all-office meetings. The games can serve break the ice or provide a way to learn more about coworkers and management. Employee games can range from teaching office skills to simply providing entertainment.

Truth and Lies

Learn a little about what each of your employees knows and doesn't know about each other. Ask each to create a short truthful statement about something he has done and one that is fictitious. Ask employees to be creative and try to make the truthful and fictitious statements difficult to tell apart. After a minute, choose an employee to read his two statements. Each of the other employees holds up a card indicating if he believes statement one or statement two was the truthful one. The employee then reveals which one was true. Continue around the circle until each employee has read her statement. The statements do not have to be work-related.

Take Away Game

Pair employees into groups of two, and give them each 15 markers placed in a line in between them. The two alternate turns taking between one and three markers from the line. The employee who takes the last marker wins. After the game is played for about 20 minutes by each pair, get the group together. Discuss what the players think were winning strategies. In addition to being entertaining, this game teaches people how long-term planning leads to the desired result. In this instance, players should plan to have four or eight markers remaining at the start of the opponent's turn to guarantee a win.

Christmas Employee Trivia

The Christmas Employee Trivia game requires the manager or organizer to do a little advance planning. Ask each employee to submit a fact about herself and the Christmas season that she does not think any other employee knows. Gather the statements before the party into a list and print it out. Ask each employee to place a coworker's name next to each statement, using each name only once. After each employee has completed her sheet and put his name on it, collect the sheets and distribute them to other employees for scoring. Read the statements and ask the employee who wrote it to stand up after it is read. The winner is the player who has the most correct guesses on her sheet.

References

About the Author

Alan Kirk has been writing for online publications since 2006. He has more than 15 years' experience in catering, management and government relations. Kirk has a bachelor's degree in business management from the University of Maryland.

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