How to Buy Shiseido Cosmetics to Sell in a Salon

Many salon owners looking to increase per-head profit look to product sales as a simple way to increase revenues and the bottom line. Shiseido is a highly sought-after brand among hair care professionals and salon owners throughout the world. The company traces its roots back to the 1870s, and is responsible for introducing soda pop and ice cream to the people of Japan. It is more well known, however, for its extensive line of hair care and beauty products. Shiseido has a long-established reputation as a popular and profitable product line for salon owners. However, there are potential pitfalls to bringing the product into a salon as well.

Analyze your customer base and your available storage and display space. Shiseido manufactures dozens of products for a wide variety of hair care and beauty needs. They have a full line of shampoos and conditioners as well as an extensive makeup line. You may not have room to display everything your customers could possibly want. Focus on the products that support your main services and lines of business.

Contact several Shiseido wholesalers. You have a wide variety of choices. Some manufacturers restrict their distributorships to just one or a few wholesale distributors. However, Shiseido has allowed dozens of companies to become Shiseido distributors, offering bulk prices low enough to allow their wholesalers an attractive profit margin on re-sales to retail sellers.

Compare prices and terms. You should have a reasonable expectation of what your Shiseido product sales will be. A very low price per unit may not make sense for you if it comes combined with an unrealistically high-minimum order. Choose the wholesaler that offers the best combination of price and delivery terms for your particular business. You may pay a higher price per unit of product in exchange for a more realistic or flexible delivery schedule or ongoing purchase commitment.

Place the order. Many wholesalers will drop-ship your order directly to you using UPS, the Postal Service or other delivery agency. Some will have their own truck or van drop off the product to you from local distributor or warehouse. You should have someone waiting for the order, or arrange a delivery to a secure location to prevent theft.

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About the Author

Leslie McClintock has been writing professionally since 2001. She has been published in "Wealth and Retirement Planner," "Senior Market Advisor," "The Annuity Selling Guide," and many other outlets. A licensed life and health insurance agent, McClintock holds a B.A. from the University of Southern California.