How to End a Leadership Speech

by Erin Schreiner; Updated September 26, 2017

Giving a good speech is a wonderful way to establish yourself as a clear and charismatic leader. In speeches about leadership, speakers often aim to make themselves seem an appropriate choice for leading a group. To ensure that this message is heard loud and clear, compose a strong speech conclusion. In doing so, you can leave your listeners with the most important parts of your message, proving to them that you are the person that they should choose, or continue to support, in your leadership position.

Step 1

Make your case. Though you have likely given many reasons why you are a good leader in your speech, you should conclude by making your case once more. The argument you make in the last minutes of your speech is the one most likely to stick with your listeners. To ensure that they are left with just the right idea, end with a final argument of your suitability.

Step 2

Conclude with a quote. Adopt the words of another as a way to close out your speech. Select a quote that relates to leadership or one of the leadership qualities that you discussed throughout the course of your speech. This strong quote will leave listeners thinking, likely making your speech stick with them longer.

Step 3

End with a call to action. Leave your listeners clear as to what you want them to do by closing with a call to action. Tell your listeners to get to the polls, support your cause or select your side on an issue in the last moments of your speech.

Step 4

Employee a bookend closure. Give your speech a polished and professional feel by using a bookend closure. End your speech in a manner almost identical to the way in which you started it. For example, If you started with a discussion of respect, conclude with this same discussion, perhaps finally answering a question that you posed in the first few minutes of your speech.

About the Author

Erin Schreiner is a freelance writer and teacher who holds a bachelor's degree from Bowling Green State University. She has been actively freelancing since 2008. Schreiner previously worked for a London-based freelance firm. Her work appears on eHow, Trails.com and RedEnvelope. She currently teaches writing to middle school students in Ohio and works on her writing craft regularly.