How to Send Registered Mail

by Edriaan Koening; Updated September 26, 2017
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The United States Postal Service offers a registered mail service. Use registered mail to send valuable or irreplaceable items. The USPS keeps registered mail items under tight security from the time you lodge the item until the recipient receives the item. If any loss or damage occurs, you can receive compensation of up to $25,000. The USPS also offers extra services to combine with the registered mail service, such as online tracking of the date and time of delivery.

Items you will need

  • Weight scale
  • Envelope or box
Step 1

Weigh your item. If you are sending a flat item such as a postcard, a letter or an envelope, use first-class mail. If the item weighs 13 ounces or less, use first-class mail. Otherwise, purchase a priority mail flat-rate envelope or box.

Step 2

Pack your item in an envelope or box of your own choosing if using first-class mail. Otherwise, place it in a priority mail flat-rate envelope or box.

Step 3

Bring the package to your local post office and request registered mail service. Add other services if needed. Delivery confirmation lets you check the date and time of delivery or attempted delivery. Signature confirmation provides the signature of the mail recipient. If you are sending an item you have sold, the USPS can collect the postage and price of the item from the recipient if you use the collect on delivery, or COD, service. Return receipt provides you with a letter or email containing the recipient's signature. Only a specified recipient can receive a restricted delivery item.

Step 4

Make a payment for the registered mail item. You pay for the postage, the registered mail service and any other extra service. The price of the registered mail service depends on the declared value of the item.

Tips

  • Send your mail early because registered mail could take 10 to 14 days to arrive at the destination due to security precautions.

About the Author

Edriaan Koening began writing professionally in 2005, while studying toward her Bachelor of Arts in media and communications at the University of Melbourne. She has since written for several magazines and websites. Koening also holds a Master of Commerce in funds management and accounting from the University of New South Wales.

Photo Credits

  • Alexandra Grablewski/Photodisc/Getty Images