Starting a Chicken Egg Laying Business

by Candace Webb; Updated September 26, 2017
Continually adding young chicks will stagger the ages of your layers.

If you have always enjoyed the idea of farming, but did not want to invest in large, expensive farm equipment, a chicken laying business might be the perfect solution. A chicken laying business provides eggs to customers and allows you to tap into the inner farmer you have been denying. While a chicken laying business can be started with relatively little funding, there are still things that you should do to ensure the venture will be successful.

Determine how many hens you will have. Each hen will average one egg per day, according to Best Example's website. If you wish to produce 700 eggs a week, you will need 100 hens in the business.

Choose or build a chickenhouse. Regardless of the climate you live in, your chickens will need to be housed and provided with warmth. Chicken farm expert Robert Plamondon recommends two square feet for each hen. Remember to plan room for future growth and additional hens and include that in your building plan. Check with your city's planning and zoning departments to make sure you are allowed to raise chickens and put a building on the property you want to use.

Enclose the land surrounding the hen house with chicken wire fencing. This will allow the hens to move freely inside and outside without being able to escape. Be sure to include a swinging gate so you can enter and exit the area without trouble.

Purchase your stock. You can find many chicken breeders online.You also can check with your local veterinarian to locate reputable breeders in your area. Be sure to include one rooster for the hen house. Roosters will help keep your hens safe by acting as a watchdog over the hen house.

Retain the services of a veterinarian who specializes in the care of chickens. Have your flock undergo regular check-ups to avoid the spread of illness or problems.

About the Author

Candace Webb has been writing professionally since 1989. She has worked as a full-time journalist as well as contributed to metropolitan newspapers including the "Tennessean." She has also worked on staff as an associate editor at the "Nashville Parent" magazine. Webb holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism with a minor in business from San Jose State University.

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