How to Bid Medical Office Cleaning Contracts

by Heidi Carson, MS - Updated September 26, 2017

Starting your own cleaning business can be very lucrative. You can set the hours that you work and for whom you work for. To bid on various job, you need to have some idea of how to bid a job. You should also have some skills on how to formally create and submit bid proposals.

Prepare an idea of what the medical professional likes to see from the company that cleans its space because bidding on cleaning medical office space can be very competitive. You need to be bonded and insured, and this should be stated on your professional letterhead. Call the office manager and get an idea of what the square footage is of the medical office space that needs to be cleaned.

Create a bid based upon square footage and charge anywhere from $18- to $20 per squire foot or if the office space is small, then charge by the job.

Take a tour of the medical office space to properly bid on a cleaning job so that you can find out exactly what they want cleaned. Set a standard by letting the office know that you do not handle any medical equipment for this will help to safeguard your business against any loss. Have the office specify what specific areas they need cleaned and how often.

Ask the medical office if you can take photos of the space. This will help you when you go to create the bid proposal. Add the photos to your portfolio and use it as a marketing tool when you go to get other cleaning jobs.

Create a fast turn-around time when submitting a bid for cleaning a medical office space. After you tour the office space, go home and create your professional bid. Include your time and any supplies that you will need to complete the cleaning job.

When typing the bid, be very detailed-oriented and include what area you will be cleaning and how often along the supplies that you will be bringing with you to the job.

Check your spelling and hand deliver the bid to the person in charge of making the decisions. Give the office about seven days to look over the bid and then follow it up with a phone call to ask if the office has any questions regarding the bid you submitted.

About the Author

Based in Rochester, N.Y., Heidi Carson is an employee training specialist with over 14 years of experience in the behavioral health field. Carson has been writing for Demand Studios since the summer of 2009. She received her Bachelor of Arts from St. John Fisher college in psychology and her Master of Science from from the University of Rochester in human development.

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