How to Start an Evaluation

by Pat Fontana; Updated September 26, 2017

Employee evaluations are challenging, for both the supervisor and the employee. The supervisor may not want to confront the employee if there are negative aspects to the evaluation. The employee may be nervous about whether the supervisor will provide a fair evaluation. The most difficult step can be starting the process. Preparation will help the evaluation process run smoother and will help ensure an objective, productive discussion about the employee’s performance.

Step 1

Use a standardized evaluation template for all employees. Your company’s human resources department can provide you with a form to be used so that all evaluations are conducted equally.

Step 2

Read through the questions on the evaluation once before attempting to respond to any of them. Be sure you understand what each question means. If you have any questions, check with your human resources department to clarify.

Step 3

Review the employee’s personnel records. Determine if there have been any problem areas, such as tardiness or failure to complete projects on deadline, as well as any significant accomplishments, such as solving a customer service issue or winning a proposal.

Step 4

Write your responses to the questions on the evaluation form, based on the information you have reviewed about the employee. Provide a copy to the employee prior to the evaluation meeting, to have him or her provide feedback.

Step 5

Schedule the evaluation meeting at a convenient time and place for both you and the employee. Schedule enough time for questions and discussion should there be any concerns on either part.

Tips

  • Encourage employees to be open and honest when providing their feedback on the evaluation form.

Warnings

  • Do not schedule the evaluation meeting close to lunch time or the end of the day, when you and the employee will feel rushed.

About the Author

Pat Fontana began her career in 1981. Her extensive experience includes work in small business, entrepreneurship, marketing communications, adult education and training. She has written for Entrepreneur, Atlantic Publishing and other clients. Fontana earned a Master's degree in English with a concentration in Technical and Professional Communications from East Carolina University.