How to Create Your Own Skate Logo

A logo is its brand's public face. It is the first thing a consumer associates with a brand, and because of this, a logo can define a brand’s position within its industry. When an entrepreneur in the skate industry designs a logo, he should keep his brand identity at the forefront of his mind because the logo tells consumers what to expect from his brand. If the logo does not match the brand, potential customers could be turned off from the brand.

Identify Your Brand

Your brand identity is the driving force behind your logo’s design. Think of your brand identity as your brand’s personality. Are you a beginner-friendly skate brand, or is your core audience experienced, daring skaters? Is your product or service inexpensive and thus the ideal choice for budget-minded skateboarders, or do you work with more affluent clients who have sophisticated tastes?

Answering these questions as well as questions about what you provide and how you want to be perceived will help you develop your brand identity.

Choose Design Elements That Fit Your Brand

Once you have determined your brand identity, choose design elements that match it. These design elements include:

  • Color
  • Shape
  • Font
  • Imagery

Study how design choices like color and shape in a logo communicate specific brand traits. Generally, red is used to communicate boldness, while blue is associated with calm, serene brands. While triangles communicate direction, squares communicate compactness. Even the font choice you choose for your logo communicates your brand’s personality.

Although the obvious imagery choice for a skate logo is an image of a skateboard or a half pipe, your logo does not need this kind of imagery to be successful. Your brand might be better served by a two-toned image of a wave or a minimalistic image of a kangaroo wearing a helmet. Some logos have no images at all; they are comprised of just a brand’s name or initials. These are known as wordmark logos.

Research Other Skate Logos

After sketching a few ideas for your skate logo, take time to research other successful skate brand logos (and unsuccessful skate brand logos). There are a few reasons looking at other logos is a crucial step when you are creating your own skate logo. These include:

  • Seeing which kinds of skate logos are effective and which are not
  • Determining whether your logo ideas have been used before
  • Avoiding creating a logo that is too similar to an existing logo
  • Gauging how similar brands communicate their identities through logos

As a piece of your intellectual property, you will need to trademark your logo. Researching other brand logos can help you avoid inadvertently infringing on another brand’s trademark.

Craft the Logo’s Design

Whether you create the logo yourself or work with a professional graphic designer is your preference. Some skate brand owners feel confident in their design skills or have skilled artists on their teams. Others can verbalize what they want in a skate logo but cannot easily render their ideas visually. If you are in this last category, you can help the graphic designer with whom you choose to work by creating a simple sketch of your ideal logo.

Professional graphic designers can be found online or through word of mouth. You can find a graphic designer to create your skate logo through a social media platform like Instagram or Facebook or through a freelancing platform like Fiverr or 99designs. If you choose to work with a professional graphic designer, she can help you polish your design ideas for an effective logo for your brand or even use your brand identity to design a new logo from scratch.

References

About the Author

Lindsay Kramer has been a full-time writer since 2014. In that time, she's experienced the ups, downs and crazy twists life tends to take when you're launching, building and leading a small business. As a small business owner, her favorite aspect about writing in this field is helping other small business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs become more fluent in the terminology and concepts they face in this role. Previously, she's written on entrepreneurship for 99designs and covered business law topics for law firms.