How to Design a Retail Store Organizational Chart

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Retail stores may have as few as two or three employees, or up to several hundred in a large department store. A smaller store usually doesn't have a formal organizational chart, while a large one relies on a well-planned and thought-out chart. The store management has several choices in the style of the chart depending on their philosophy of the way the store should be run. Regardless of which style of management is chosen, most larger retail store organizational charts begin to look similar to a Christmas tree in the way they spread downward from a single point.

Decide if you want the store to be managed by department or by task. For instance, the men's and women's clothing department can have separate managers with their own buyer, merchandise managers and clerks. Another way to manage the store is to have departments as sub-branches, with a manager, buyer and merchandise manager serving all the departments.

Place the person who is ultimately in charge of the store at the top of the chart in her own box. This may be the owner, the general manager or the store president.

Draw a line downward to boxes with positions that report directly to the main manager. This would be employees such as the bookkeeper, the head of security, the department managers, buyers, marketing and any other management position.

Draw a sideways line to any special position that reports directly to the boss but is not a manager herself. A typical position in the chart is an administrative assistant.

Draw a line downwards from the sub-managers and connect to boxes for those who report to them, such as an assistant manager, administrative clerks and sales people.

Look through the payroll charts to ensure that every employee is accounted for on the chart. Each person should be in at least one box, with a clear line indicating who he reports to. Positions that are currently unfilled are noted by a blank box. Positions that may be added to the store at a later date are often noted with a gray box with a dotted line.

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About the Author

Jack Burton started writing professionally in 1980 with articles in "Word from Jerusalem," "ICEJ Daily News" and Tagalong Garden News. He has managed radio stations, TV studios and newspapers, and was the chief fundraiser for Taltree Arboretum. Burton holds a B.S. in broadcasting from John Brown University. He is a 26-year veteran of the U.S. Navy/Navy Reserves and the Navy Seabees.

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