How to Start a Health Store

by Brenda Asheim; Updated July 27, 2017

Items you will need

  • Market research
  • Business plan
  • Ideal location
  • Reliable suppliers
  • Nest egg

Thanks to celebrities like Dr. Oz and Oprah who promote a healthy lifestyle on TV, more consumers are turning to health stores for the latest super foods, organic produce, natural remedies and nutritional supplements. If you're an ambitious entrepreneur with good business sense and a passion for helping customers choose healthier alternatives, now is the ideal time to open a health store. Whether you start up a new store or invest in an established franchise, here are a few things you need to ensure the financial health of your business.

How to start a health store

Step 1

Do extensive market research to determine what kind of people shop at health stores, and if there is a demand for one in your area.

Step 2

Create a business plan that states the reason for establishing your business, the competitive advantages of your health store over similar stores in the area, the type of products you will carry, the kind of customers you will attract, and your pricing policy.

Step 3

Scout ideal locations for your health store, taking into consideration health-food demand in the area, convenience, parking, and proximity to potential competitors, such as a nearby supermarket that stocks health-food items.

Step 4

Thoroughly check supplier credentials so that you have a reliable supplier base in place for providing high-quality goods.

Step 5

Set aside at least one-year's salary to live on while you are waiting for your sales to turn a profit.

Tips

  • If you have little experience dealing with marketing, advertising and suppliers, consider investing in a franchise that offers you the advantage of an already-existing brand name with established supplier connections and a built-in customer base.

Warnings

  • Owning and managing any kind of retail store is a demanding job for self-motivated individuals who are willing to put in long hours to keep the business running successfully.

About the Author

Brenda Asheim is a freelance copywriter in the Seattle area. She has more than 25 years of experience writing ad copy for anything from Fortune 500 to small businesses in high-tech, health care and consumer industries. A second-degree black belt and certified taekwondo instructor, Asheim also writes the Seattle Fitness Examiner column.