Obstacles to Overcome When Implementing Change Inside an Organization

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Any change that an organization attempts to implement comes with obstacles. However, if the organization works hard before implementing changes, this can help diminish the amount of obstacles the company may face. Before bringing news of a huge change to a company, owners and higher management should evaluate the potential problems and attempt to fix them. Employees and managers may likely receive the news of change better if the adjustments have been well thought out.

Employee Resistance

The Change Management Learning Center states the employees may resist change to an organization causing a major obstacle. Reasons for employee resistance may include loss of control and misunderstanding. Help your employees feel included in the changes by asking for opinions regarding implementing the changes appropriately. Encourage the employees to ask questions to clear up all misunderstandings.

Management Communication

Managers may cause problems when communicating the change to employees, according to mediate.com. If management does not communicate the plans for the company well, this could make implementing the change near impossible. Train the managers in what they need to do and say. Check to make sure that each manager shares the changes with their employees to avoid miscommunication.

Inability to Adapt

If too much change happens to an organization, employees may have trouble keeping up. Implement small changes in order to allow each employee to adapt to the difference in the organization. If it seems that management and employees struggle to implement the changes, spend extra time training them before adding more changes.

Insufficient Resources

Companies sometimes expect change without having the resources to implement them. Before the company makes the changes, it should make sure that the money, employees, and time all line up with the intended change. If the company finds that it does not have the resources, the organization should reevaluate the changes before make them public to avoid extra obstacles.

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About the Author

Cassandra Scheidies has been writing professionally since 1997. Her work has appeared in "The Kearney Hub" newspaper and "Chicken Soup for the Preteen Soul." She holds a Master of Arts in mental health counseling from Denver Seminary.

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