States that Reciprocate a Pharmacist's License with Florida

by Roger Thorne J.D.; Updated September 26, 2017

The state of Florida, along with all other states, requires that pharmacists must obtain state licensing before they can work in the state as a pharmacist. A licensed pharmacist in Florida can sometimes work in another state if that other state accepts the Florida pharmacist license, a practice known as reciprocity. Each state has its own pharmacist reciprocity laws, which are subject to change.

Reciprocity

According to Visalaw.com, most, but not all, states allow Florida licensed pharmacists to obtain licensure through reciprocity. The states that, as of June 2011, that allow for pharmacist reciprocity licensing from other states but do not allow for pharmacists from Florida are Alabama, Hawaii and Wyoming. California does not allow for pharmacist reciprocity licensing from any state.

Application

Florida pharmacists seeking to obtain licensure in another state through reciprocity must apply for licensure though the requirements differ between states. For example, a pharmacist seeking licensure in Main must submit an application along with various fees, according to the Maine Office of Licensing and Registration. The state requires a $250 fee for license reciprocity applications, a $21 fee for a criminal background check and a $100 fee for any exam score transfers.

Reciprocity Requirements

While many states do allow reciprocity with Florida, many also impose additional requirements before a licensed Florida pharmacist can obtain licensure in that state. For example, the state of Alaska requires that the pharmacist must be able to provide verification of having worked at least 1,500 hours as a pharmacist before they can obtain licensure through reciprocity. The pharmacist must also have certification through the Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Examination Committee, North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination and Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Examination.

Florida and Other States

Florida also allows licensed pharmacists from other states to work in Florida, but the pharmacist must meet specific requirements. Florida requires that an applicant must show that she has been a practicing pharmacist for at least two of the prior five tears and has participated in at least 30 hours of continuing legal education prior to applying, or has spent 2080 hours as an intern.

About the Author

Roger Thorne is an attorney who began freelance writing in 2003. He has written for publications ranging from "MotorHome" magazine to "Cruising World." Thorne specializes in writing for law firms, Web sites, and professionals. He has a Juris Doctor from the University of Kansas.