Objectives of Organizational Analysis

by James G. Pradke; Updated September 26, 2017
computer on a desk

An analysis is a type of research designed to produce a look at what is and what could be. Organizational analysis specifically examines the current state of a company's operational and structural framework and productivity indicators such as rates of production. Four key areas of organizational analysis exist, each with its own objectives.

Productivity

The objective of productivity analysis is to analyze efficiency and production by directly correlating the outcome of a product or service to the overall business operation. This type of analysis determines everything involved in production. A version of this is historical analysis, which examines productivity in relation to a previous period's operation. Productivity analysis is most useful for service providers or organizations involved in producing a hard product.

Efficiency

The objective of an efficiency analysis is to determine whether a company is conducting operations in the safest but quickest manner. The results of this analysis may result in a company identifying areas of excess, which it could eliminate and save costly overhead. Organizations that conduct a thorough efficiency analysis, or make this one of the objectives of an overall study, usually find ways to improve speed, time management and workload management.

Team Building

All organizations require teamwork. Team building analysis, which goes beyond interpersonal issues, unearths how tasks and projects are being distributed and completed. This type of analysis also yields key leaders in the organization. It becomes clear who the standouts are -- those who can prove valuable to organizations looking to grow.

Communications

A key objective to a thorough organizational analysis is that of communications. Elements of organizational communications include email systems, telecommunications, interoffice systems and any additional systems that relate to productivity. An analysis with effective communication as the objective will highlight those systems that are successful -- "successful" being defined as contributing to the overall efficiency, productivity and team building efforts of the organization.

About the Author

James G. Pradke began writing freelance in 2010 and currently authors the "Clarion Post." Areas of particular expertise include education, small business, arts, international travel, and home and garden. Pradke possesses a Master of Arts in international peace and conflict resolution from American Military University.

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