How to Increase Group Cohesion

by Katya Gordeeva; Updated September 26, 2017
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Working in groups has become common in the workplace and at school. Working with others may not always be easy, especially when members disagree a lot. Not getting along with other group members can have consequences, such as not finishing a project on time and consequently exceeding budgetary limitations. Instead of becoming angry over disagreements, groups should learn how to stick together. If a group is cohesive, members are more motivated to work together toward a single goal — that is, make their project a success.

Step 1

Spend a few minutes getting to know each other. Introduce yourselves if you do not already know each other. Find out a little bit about one another's background, so it does not feel like you are working with strangers the whole time.

Step 2

Assign roles to every member if the project requires working together for a long period of time to accomplish a goal. For example, one member may be the group leader, while another member is a note taker.

Step 3

Identify the group's goal in the beginning. Schedule a meeting to discuss what you want to accomplish and what you need to do to succeed. Document the group's goal to ensure that everyone is on the same page and that everyone agrees to accomplish the same goal.

Step 4

Communicate openly and honestly with everyone. Schedule weekly meetings, so everyone can discuss how things are progressing. Members should feel comfortable sharing their feelings with one another — whether they are good or bad. Every member should get a chance to speak, while others should listen and be respectful.

Step 5

Praise other group members when they succeed in their goals. You can make someone feel good about himself if you give him a compliment about his work. Additionally, if you notice a group member making mistakes, offer to help him.

Step 6

Do not ignore a conflict. If members of the group disagree about something, schedule a meeting to discuss your differences. If you avoid talking about a conflict, group members may become disinterested and they may lose focus on the ultimate goal you are trying to achieve.

About the Author

Katya Gordeeva began writing professionally in 2009. She has had several news and feature articles published in "The Chronicle," "Northwest Indiana Times" and "Gary 411" newspapers. Gordeeva is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in public relations from Purdue University Calumet.

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