How to Win a Workers' Comp Stress Claim

by Desdemona Delacroix; Updated September 26, 2017
There are judges in every state who can preside over your workers' compensation claims.

If you have been injured or fallen ill because of the stress you experienced at your job, you may be eligible to receive workers' compensation. Each state has its own regulations governing this special type of insurance, but no matter where your injury or illness occurred, there are many resources available to help you with your claim. If you claimed stress and your claim was denied by your employer, you can appeal the denial by arming yourself with some information.

Step 1

Plan your claim carefully. In most situations, an employee claim of stress will be widely open to interpretation. How you present it from the beginning is crucial. It is important that you be able to clearly link an injury or illness to stress that was directly a result of your employment.

Step 2

Contact your employer and notify it that you need to make a workers' comp claim. It should help walk you through the process and get your claim submitted.

Step 3

Contact a state workers' compensation official (see Resource) with any questions you have about the claims process while you wait for a decision. The official can explain the workers' comp claims process to you and let you know what to expect.

Step 4

Wait to hear what the employer and the insurance company say about your claim. Their decision will be provided to you in writing. Once you receive the decision, read over it thoroughly.

Step 5

Hire an attorney if your claim was denied. You can appeal the decision by going to a workers' compensation hearing without a lawyer, but be aware that your employer will have an attorney there to defend its decision. If you want to win your claim, you will need to pay for an experienced lawyer.

About the Author

Desdemona Delacroix has been working as a freelance author in her spare time since 2000, writing short do-it-yourself and current events articles. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology from the University of Maryland University College, and she occasionally offers tutoring services in writing to undergraduate college students.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images