How to Set Administrative Goals

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Setting administrative goals is a way of ensuring that tasks are met to the correct deadline. It is also a way of effectively managing a team because it is easier to make clear everybody's role in an organization. To successfully set administrative goals, it is necessary to research into the nature of the project and to know the capabilities of those working on the project. Setting administrative goals can be done simply, without much technical knowledge, and will greatly improve the efficiency of a team.

Break down the project into smaller segments. This will help to make it more manageable. For example, if the project as a whole will take six weeks, break it down into weekly sections. This will allow for regular progress reports, which will allow you to better respond to potential areas of weakness.

Set up a reward system for beating the weekly target. This will ensure that the staff stay motivated in performing the administrative goals. At the start of each week, hold a short meeting detailing the administrative tasks that are to be completed that week. Ensure that everyone is familiar with their role and inform them of the rewards for beating the deadline.

Hold regular debrief sessions with the employees working on the project at the end of each weekly section. Allow them to tell you of operational problems, which will allow you to allocate more resources to a particular area at the beginning of the next week.

Set reasonable goals. If the end of the first week shows that the project is well behind schedule, then it is sensible to rewrite the administrative tasks. While goals should act as a framework, they should also be somewhat flexible because unachievable goals will lead to low morale among your employees.

Hold a meeting upon the completion of the project to gain overall feedback. This will greatly improve project management in future and will allow you to gain a knowledge of how employees respond to different tasks. Make it clear that constructive criticism is welcomed. Take note of all that is said in the feedback session for your notes .

About the Author

Emile Heskey has been a professional writer since 2008, when he began writing for "The Journal" student newspaper. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in modern history and politics from Oxford University, as well as a Master of Science in Islamic and Middle Eastern studies from Edinburgh University.

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