How to Create Your Own Barcode Asset Tags

by Peyton Brookes; Updated September 26, 2017
Implementing a solid asset management system affects a company's bottom line

Asset management is a critical component of running a business successfully. Managing your assets helps reduce losses associated with regular operations. Asset tags allow you to track, manage, upgrade and prevent the loss of company assets. As a result, implementing a solid asset management system affects a company’s bottom line, increasing revenue and decreasing losses. Several methods are available for creating your own barcode asset tags.

Items you will need

  • Word processing program
  • Barcode asset tag labels
Step 1

Determine how you will track your assets. Tracking methods affect asset tag type. For example, if assets are mobile, you may consider creating multiple tags for the same asset. Multiple tags include the same asset number and can be placed in multiple locations like the asset and related documentation.

Step 2

Decide what type of tag you need. Asset tags are available in different materials, including metal and paper. Decide how long your asset requires a tag. For example, information technology and mobile assets may require long-lasting metal tags. Consumable items like hospital supplies require temporary removable paper tags.

Step 3

Purchase the appropriate tags. You can use simple LaserJet compatible tags or heavy-duty labels or tags. Office product companies like Avery offer identification labels and tags. Purchase the appropriate tags and download the required template. You may also create the label in a word processing program using the specified label dimensions.

Step 4

Create your labels using a word-processing program. Print your labels using the tags you purchased. Apply the labels to each of your assets.

About the Author

Peyton Brookes is a workforce development expert and has written professionally about technology, education and science since 2009. She spent several years developing technology and finance courses for social programs in the Washington, D.C. area. She studied computer and information science at the University of Maryland College Park.

Photo Credits

bibliography-icon icon for annotation tool Cite this Article