How to Update MSDS Binders

by Bonnie Conrad; Updated September 26, 2017
An MSDS binder is an important part of your safety strategy.

No matter what the nature of your business, chances are good that you work with potentially hazardous chemicals. Items as seemingly innocuous as printer toner and floor cleaner can be harmful in the event of a spill, and it is important for every company to have a strategy in place to deal with potential dangers in the workplace, such as creating an MSDS binder. This binder should contain material safety data sheets for every potentially hazardous item used in the business.

Find your current MSDS binder if you have one. If your MSDS information is not currently housed in a binder, find a suitable one. A binder in a bright yellow or orange color works well—these bright colors will stand out and make the binder easy to locate when it is needed.

Look through the MSDS forms in the binder and discard any for products that are no longer used. If you are unsure whether a certain chemical is still used, it is best to err on the side of caution and retain the MSDS.

Log on to the websites of the companies that manufacture any chemicals for which you do not have a current MSDS. You may need to search the website for the term "MSDS" or go to the site map to look for safety information.

Print an MSDS for each chemical your company uses, from waxes and cleaners to printer toners and fuser cartridges. Place the MSDS form in a plastic sheet protector and insert it in the binder.

Log on to the website of the manufacturer for each existing MSDS to see if there is updated information available. MSDS information is updated from time to time. Check for updated information at least once a year.

Locate the MSDS binder in a convenient location and make sure all employees know where to find the information. It is often helpful to create more than one MSDS binder and locate a separate binder near each potentially hazardous chemical. For instance, you could place one MSDS binder near the copier, another near the printer and others scattered throughout the shop floor.

About the Author

Based in Pennsylvania, Bonnie Conrad has been working as a professional freelance writer since 2003. Her work can be seen on Credit Factor, Constant Content and a number of other websites. Conrad also works full-time as a computer technician and loves to write about a number of technician topics. She studied computer technology and business administration at Harrisburg Area Community College.

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