How to Get an MSHA Certification

by Dawn Marcotte; Updated September 26, 2017

The Mine Safety Health Administration (MSHA) is responsible for testing mining products for use in underground coal and gassy mines. The administration certifies a product as compliant with all federal regulations before a manufacturer can begin production and distribution. This certification in recognized internationally as a certification of safety. Application packets can be submitted electronically or in paper form. Specific application packets are divided into two categories, changes to existing items that have already been certified and applications for review of new items. New items can fall under one of several subcategories, including applied engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and quality control. Each category has specific items to be submitted with a letter requesting approval.

Step 1

Write the approval application letter. All approval letters must contain company name, address and details regarding the item to be approved. Additional schematics and detailed diagrams may be required. A letter of authorization stating the applicant is the individual responsible for the quality control and testing of the proposed item. A checklist may also be required. These additional documents and forms are available at The letter along with supporting documentation can be mailed to: MSHA Approval and Certification Center Attention: IPSO 765 Technology Drive, Triadelphia, WV 26059. The documents can also be submitted by fax to 304-547-2044 or electronically to

Step 2

Authorize payment of the required fees. Once the application packet has been received and processed an estimate of the fee that will be required to certify the item will be sent to the applicant with an authorization to pay form. This form certifies that the company will pay the estimated fees to get the item certified. This form must be submitted to the MSHA within 30 days of receipt or the application is cancelled.

Step 3

Provide any other information requested. Additional documentation may be requested in addition to testing and inspections. Once these have been completed, an approval letter will be issued. If changes, improvements or modifications are made to the item a new certificate is required.

About the Author

Based in Minneapolis, Dawn Marcotte has been writing for more than 10 years. Her recent writing has turned to nonfiction and includes articles on home and garden, education, crafts and automotive subjects. She currently has several eBooks published and available online. Marcotte has a Bachelor of Science in elementary education from the University of Iowa.

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