How to Manage a Auto Mechanic Shop Business

by Maggie McCormick; Updated September 26, 2017

The manager of an auto mechanic shop can make or break the business. You need to know both how to fix cars and run a profitable business. Also know how to deal with customers so that they keep coming back. Get organized to help you manage an auto repair business and watch your bottom line improve.

Step 1

Hire employees with experience. Mistakes in auto repair can be quite dangerous, so be sure to hire mechanics who have both knowledge and experience. Before hiring staff, you may want to give a simple hands-on test -- show applicants a broken engine and ask them to fix it. Good employees will form the foundation of your business, so take time to choose the right ones.

Step 2

Check that your business acts within local and federal laws. Violating laws could mean that the authorities will quickly close your business. You may want to hire a lawyer to help you with this. It's always better to find a good lawyer before you need one.

Step 3

Cultivate a good relationship with parts dealers. Be sure that you can get the parts you need delivered quickly. If you have a good relationship with the parts dealers, you can be sure that your order will take priority.

Step 4

Purchase commonly needed items to store on location. It's smart to have things like fan belts, tires and other products that your customers are likely to need on site. This allows you to repair cars more quickly.

Step 5

Set up a customer database. Ask customers for their address and telephone numbers and ask if it's OK for you to contact them. Send them a reminder when it's time for an oil change or a letter if there has been a recall on the parts that you used. You can also send them special coupons. Having this kind of database and relationship with your customers can create loyal customers and repeat business.

Step 6

Choose an accountant who understands your business. If you manage an auto mechanic business, you don't want to take care of the financial details. That's best left up to a professional accountant. When looking at accountants, look for one who understands your business, including any tax deductions for which you may be eligible.

References

About the Author

Maggie McCormick is a freelance writer. She lived in Japan for three years teaching preschool to young children and currently lives in Honolulu with her family. She received a B.A. in women's studies from Wellesley College.