How to Sell TV Advertising

by Michelle Barry; Updated September 26, 2017
Teenage girls watching television

To be successful selling television advertising, hone your knowledge of your programming as well as the target audience of the business you are pitching. Researching the company's target audience before you pitch makes your presentation more personal and effective. Connecting these dots means ad sales revenue for you and new business revenue for your client.

Promote Your Brand

If you are on the sales team of a large cable network, promote the fact that you have more tools at your disposal than a smaller company. The analytics and demographic data large cable companies have creates better reporting capabilities and advertising spots that are expertly matched with the target audience of the business. A small broadcast network has a more intimate and personal understanding of the market it serves. This fact connects well with small businesses and those looking to connect with a small and specific market segment.

Hook With Low Prices

The cost of television ads can be intimidating to a company new to this segment of advertising. To help them over the initial financial hurdle, entice them with discounted or promotional pricing. Promote time slots that have lower viewership but with demographics that still connect with the business's target audience. For example, early morning news time slots are typically less costly but hit primarily professionals.

Target Market Data

Both cable and broadcast companies have reports for viewership, complete with demographics, for all their advertising slots. Research the company you are pitching to learn who their prime customers are. Outline some time slots and programs that connect with the business owner's target audience, showing charts and graphs to give a visual outline of the viewers in the pitched programming.

Competition Comparison

A strong selling point for a new advertising customer is information about what their competitor is doing. While you won't be able to disclose the specific details of a competitor's marketing plan to the business owner, you can indicate that a competitor is advertising on your network and which channels they advertise on. This could motivate a business owner to step up their own advertising to protect their segment of the market.

About the Author

Michelle Barry graduated from Salve Regina University with a Bachelor of Arts in English. Since then, she has worked as a reporter for the Wilbraham-Hampden Times, an editor for Month9Books and Evolved Publishing, editor and has spent the past seven years in marketing and graphic design. She also has an extensive background in dance.

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