How to Obtain HVAC Certification in Nevada

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) technicians are in great demand already in many places in the United States, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects HVAC technician job positions to grow by over 25 percent through 2018. It bases its projection on the large increase in home ownership recently and the need to replace residential heating and cooling systems every 10 to 15 years. There is no national licensing standard for HVAC technicians. Some states have their own specific licensing requirements, usually including a knowledge-based licensing exam, but other states leave it to local governments to license HVAC and other trade and construction occupations. Nevada requires that an HVAC contractor who has passed the necessary State of Nevada licensing exams supervise all work, but each county in Nevada has its own licensing regulations and standards for HVAC mechanics.

Complete an HVAC certification/licensing program at your local trade school or community college. Depending on which of the various HVAC-related certifications you are training for, these programs generally last from 3 months to one year.

Register for, take and pass the Clark County, Nevada, Journeyman HVAC Mechanic exam (administered by Pearson VUE through the International Code Council (ICC)). You can register to take the exam online or by telephone but you must take the exam in person at a local testing center.

Apply to ICC for your Clark County, Nevada, Journeyman HVAC Mechanic's lD. Take your official score letter from the exam and your new ID with you to the Clark County Development Services Department to register as a journeyman HVAC mechanic.

Tips

  • After you have 10 years of experience, you may take the Clark County, Nevada, Master HVAC Mechanic exam to qualify to become a licensed Master HVAC mechanic.

References

About the Author

Clayton Browne has been writing professionally since 1994. He has written and edited everything from science fiction to semiconductor patents to dissertations in linguistics, having worked for Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Steck-Vaughn and The Psychological Corp. Browne has a Master of Science in linguistic anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.