Comcast Voicemail Instructions

by Launie Sorrels; Updated September 26, 2017

Comcast Voice Mail is part of Comcast’s Digital Voice package. Voice mail options can be changed via the phone or through Comcast’s website. A new customer to Comcast should visit the website, or review the documentation given by the technician after the install, to see all the options presented to them. The documentation will not only describe your Digital Voice features, it will also answer some of the more commonly asked questions posed by customers.

Step 1

Dial “*99” or your home phone number to access the Comcast Voice Mail services. You will have to set up the services the first time you call. A tutorial will guide you through setting up your voice mail password, name and personal greeting.

Step 2

Check your Comcast Voice Mail by dialing “*99” or your home phone number. If you are away from home and dial your number to access your voicemail, then you will need to press the “#” button when your personal greeting begins. Once into the menu, enter your password to access your messages.

Step 3

Change your personal greeting by accessing the Comcast Voice Mail services and pressing the “4” button to go to the Personal Options menu. Next, press the “3” button to enter the Greetings Menu, and then press the “1” button for Personal Greetings. Listen to the options to change your greeting to just your name, to record a 2-minute personal greeting or a standard greeting with your phone number.

Tips

  • You can access www.comcast.net to change many options of your voice mail services. If you only have XFINITY voice then you will select the “Voice” icon. If you have XFINITY Voice and XFINITY Internet, then you will access the SmartZone and select the “Email” icon. Here you can change your voice mail password, the number of rings before calls are sent to voice mail, skipping passwords, and many other options.

About the Author

Launie Sorrels is a veteran who has worked as a chef and has more than two decades of martial arts training. His writing has developed from his experience as a quality assurance manager for Microsoft and IBM. Sorrels has a degree in computer science and is currently working on his journalism degree.