Prison Sniper Salary

by Lucas Higgins; Updated September 26, 2017
Prison snipers observe activities in the prison yard.

Prison snipers, also known as prison tower snipers or prison tower sharpshooters, work as part of the correctional structure within a prison. Prison snipers are correctional officers who have been trained to use their sharpshooting skills in case of an emergency in the prison. They observe common activities in the prison yard and may be called upon to shoot and kill inmates during a riot, hostage situation, escape attempt or when an inmate or officer's life is in danger from an attack.

Salary

Correctional officers can be assigned to numerous positions, including prison sniper, following the completion of basic academy. In May 2008 the middle 50 percent of correctional officers earned from $29,660 to $51,000. Salaries are somewhat more for employees in the federal system over state and local prisons and jails.

Firearms Training

Prison snipers must be trained in the accurate use of their weapon.

Training in shooting at long distances is a benefit in seeking a position as a prison sniper. In some prisons shooting up to 100 yards is all that is required. In others shots up to 300 yards or more are necessary. Training facilities around the U.S. provide training for two-man sniper teams. Training may lead to greater opportunity in the prison sniper field.

Military Experience

Military experience is sought after in many police, security and correctional jobs. Sniper school in any branch of military provide experience that may lead to assignments as a prison sniper upon hire as a correctional officer. Understanding windage and elevation controls and when to use them are a requirement for any sharpshooter.

Decision Making

Prison snipers are making life or death decisions in nearly every conflict they observe. Decisions are made in a coordinated fashion; however, each prison sniper has some discretion based on training and policy at the prison in when to act. Decisions must be made swiftly and based on clear judgment.

About the Author

Lucas Higgins has worked in education management since 2004 and has been an educator for more than 10 years. He holds a Master of Business Administration as well as master's and bachelor's degrees in the arts. He has published articles covering the arts, hunting, firearms and business.

Photo Credits

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