What Is the Salary for an Associate Degree in Psychology?

by Ronald Kimmons; Updated September 26, 2017

Psychology is a broad field of study that prepares students to be able to work in professions dealing with human thought and relations. Many colleges offer associate degree programs, usually lasting about two years, in the field of psychology. Getting such a degree can enhance your prospects for employment and income in the future.

Average Salary

Many institutions offer associate degrees in psychology, from highly respected universities to community colleges and online universities. According to Online Degree Talk, as of 2010, someone with an associate degree in psychology from an online university can expect to make between $29,000 and $34,040. An associate degree from a well-respected and highly accredited university may help you to get a higher wage than that. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, though, the Online Degree Talk figure puts holders of associate degrees in psychology below the average annual income level for the United States, which is $44,410.

By Profession

One reason that people with associate degrees in psychology make so little is because professions directly related to psychology and mental health are not usually very lucrative. For instance, even if you get a job as a rehabilitation counselor, which is a higher-paid mental health job that often requires at least a bachelor's degree, this means that you will only be making $35,850 per year, as of 2010. However, since the core principles of psychology can be helpful in other fields, you may be able to find higher-paying jobs. For instance, studying psychology may help you to become a very effective sales professional, in which case you might earn $100,000 or more on a commission basis.

Prospects

While getting an associate degree in psychology can help you to broaden your horizons, its most useful aspect can be the fact that it is a stepping stone toward even higher education. After getting an associate degree in psychology from a community college or online university, you may choose to enroll at a more prestigious university and pursue a bachelor's degree, which may or may not be in psychology. Your undergraduate studies in psychology may easily lead you into graduate study of medicine, law or business, which all use important skills learned in the study of psychology.

Outlook

As an associate degree in psychology does not commit you to any one career track, projecting the job outlook for someone with an associate degree in psychology may be difficult. However, if you intend to become a psychologist, you should plan on continuing in your studies past the associate level. The average annual wages for psychologists in the United States as of 2010 was $86,510, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects growth for the job market for psychologists to track the national average of other jobs from 2008 to 2018.

2016 Salary Information for Psychologists

Psychologists earned a median annual salary of $75,710 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, psychologists earned a 25th percentile salary of $56,390, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $97,780, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 166,600 people were employed in the U.S. as psychologists.

About the Author

Ronald Kimmons has been a professional writer and translator since 2006, with writings appearing in publications such as "Chinese Literature Today." He studied at Brigham Young University as an undergraduate, getting a Bachelor of Arts in English and a Bachelor of Arts in Chinese.