Beginning Med Tech Salaries

by Frank Girard; Updated September 26, 2017
Medical technologists mainly work in hospitals.

There are many different types of jobs available for medical technicians that all have varying training periods and salaries. If you’re interested in the medical profession, but don’t want to spend a long time in school, becoming a medical tech might be the right choice for you. Beginning med tech salaries vary and depend on the area of work pursued.

Nuclear Medicine Technologist

In the United States in 2008, the median salary for nuclear medicine technologists in the United States was $66,660, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. The top 10 percent of nuclear medicine technologists in the United States earned more than $87,770 annually and the bottom 10 percent earned less than $48,450. The salary range for the middle 50 percent of nuclear medicine technologists in 2008 was $57,270 and $78,240. The main responsibility of nuclear medicine technologists is to take x-rays. Nuclear medicine technologists usually have at least an associate degree.

Phlebotomist

Phlebotomists are responsible for collecting blood samples from patients in hospitals and bringing them to the hospital’s laboratory for testing, according to Education Portal. The median salary for phlebotomist is $29,407, according to Salary.com. The minimum educational requirements for becoming a phlebotomist is an associate degree. These programs typically take two years to complete and are available at community colleges around the country.

Cytotechnologist

Cytotechnologists are responsible for analyzing genetic material from tissue and blood samples, according to Education Portal. Cytotechnologists work extremely closely with pathologists who are medical doctors that specialize in studying diseases. Cytotechnologists and pathologists commonly examine tissue samples taken by surgeons to test them for cancer. The median salary for cytotechnologists in the United States is $64,345, according to Salary.com. Some of the main procedures performed by a cytotechnologist include centrifuging blood samples and categorizing slides based on the last names of patients. To become a cytotechnologist, individuals must complete a bachelor’s degree program and complete a 12 month cytotechnologist program, according to Education Portal.

Clinical Laboratory Assistant

The median salary for clinical laboratory assistants in the United States was $53,500 as of May of 2008, according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. The top 10 percent of clinical laboratory assistants in the United States earned more than $74,680 a year and the bottom 10 percent of clinical laboratory assistants earned less than $36,180. The salary range for the middle 50 percent of clinical laboratory assistants in the United States was between $44,560 and $63,420. The job of a clinical laboratory assistants help run tests on blood samples and bodily fluid. The main responsibilities of a clinical laboratory assistant are to look for parasites, bacteria, microorganisms and abnormal cells.

About the Author

Frank Girard is a copywriter and marketing consultant who has been working in the field since 1995. He has published ebooks, including "How to Succeed as a Freelance Marketing Consultant" and "101 Questions and Answers About Internet Marketing." Girard provides freelance copywriting work for clients around the country. He has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from the University of North Carolina.

Photo Credits