The Average Salary of a U.S. Marshal

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The United States Marshals Service (USMS) is a federal law-enforcement agency employed by the federal government to ensure the security and safety of the federal judicial system. These protective service professionals are often found in federal courtrooms and judicial proceedings, prisons, and other venues of the federal judicial system. They are also involved with prisoner transportation and operations, witness security, special missions, and investigative operations. The average salary of a U.S. Marshal can vary depending on several factors.

The Marshal Pay Grade

All government jobs fall into a specific pay grade. The entry-level pay grade for deputy U.S. Marshals is G-7, which, in 2014, was between $38,511 and $48,708, depending on the part of the country in which the Marshal is deployed.

Specific Locale Pay

An average beginning G-7 annual salary for a U.S. Marshal in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Gainesville metro area of Georgia was $45,940 in 2014.. The same position in Huntsville, Alabama was $44,680.

Benefits

U.S. Marshals receive a pension plan, social security, and a thrift savings plan similar to a 401K from the Federal Employees Retirement System. Annual paid leave is based on experience and ranges from 104 to 208 hours per year. Life insurance is also available.

Tough Requirements

The requirements to become a U.S. Marshal are quite strict. Candidates must be U.S. citizens between the ages of 21 and 36; and have a bachelor's degree in some form of justice or criminal study, or three years of equivalent experience. They must pass a thorough background investigation and have a good driving record, be in excellent shape, and pass a medical exam. If they pass all of these requirements, candidates undergo an intense 17-week training program.

References

About the Author

Kara Page has been a freelance writer and editor since 2007. She maintains several blogs on travel, music, food and more. She is also a contributing writer for Suite101 and has articles published on eHow and Answerbag. Page holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of North Texas.

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