Nebraska Unemployment Benefits: How Much Will I Receive?

by Luanne Kelchner; Updated September 26, 2017
The Nebraska Department of Labor oversees the unemployment insurance program in the state.

Unemployment benefits help those who are out of work pay for living expenses while searching for new employment. The Nebraska Department of Labor distributes unemployment benefits to individuals who qualify for benefits. The unemployment insurance program is funded by the quarterly unemployment insurance tax that the state requires of most Nebraska employers, according to the Nebraska Department of Labor.

Base Period

Nebraska uses a base period to determine if claimants are monetarily eligible for compensation through the unemployment program. The base period for calculating a weekly benefit amount and eligibility is the first four of the last five quarters before the individual files a claim. Four calendar quarters is a complete year of earnings.

Eligibility

To be eligible for unemployment compensation in Nebraska, workers must have earned a minimum of $2,781 in the base period, with a minimum of $800 in two separate quarters, as of January 2011, according to the Nebraska Department of Labor. In addition to monetary eligibility, claimants must be physically able to work and actively seeking new employment. The state of Nebraska may disqualify a claimant if they quit without good cause or the employer fired them for misconduct.

Weekly Benefit Amount

The maximum weekly benefit a claimant can receive in Nebraska is $348, as of January 2011. Claimants can receive unemployment benefits for a maximum of 26 weeks, but during times of high unemployment, the state and federal government may extend benefits. To calculate the weekly benefit amount, divide the earnings from the highest paying quarter by 13. Divide the result by two and round down to the nearest dollar.

Work Search Requirements

Recipients of unemployment in Nebraska must make a minimum of two employer contacts each week while collecting benefits. The claimant can make contact in person, by telephone or through an Internet contact. Claimants must keep records of employer contacts to present as evidence if the state requests verification. The state may disqualify a claimant for up to 12 weeks for refusing an offer of suitable work.

About the Author

Luanne Kelchner works out of Daytona Beach, Florida and has been freelance writing full time since 2008. Her ghostwriting work has covered a variety of topics but mainly focuses on health and home improvement articles. Kelchner has a degree from Southern New Hampshire University in English language and literature.

Photo Credits

  • Nebraska state contour against blurred USA flag image by Stasys Eidiejus from Fotolia.com